Move Over Hydrangeas – Houseplants Are Back!

Striped bamboo fern, bird's nest fern, heart fernby Lisa Eldred Steinkopf

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Houseplants have taken a back seat in the last few decades. They were huge in the 70’s hanging around in their orange macramé holders. It seems hydrangeas, cone flowers, hostas, and perennials in general were the hot topic for so many years. Guess what, houseplants are back (and so is macramé). Move over hydrangeas. I could not be happier!

There is a plethora of information out there about houseplants. More is coming out every day. Much of it isn’t all that reliable. Why does everyone still think “drainage” in the bottom of a pot is necessary? Or that misting a plant raises the humidity for any amount of time? Why do so many people not know which way their windows face? These are all questions that keep me up at night. Do they make you lose sleep? Probably not. I am a bit obsessed with houseplants.Trichomes on Tillandsia tectorum

Once these questions have been addressed and you know which way your window faces, its time to choose some appropriate plants. Low light, high light, medium light. How do you know what you have? Just because you have a south window, which should be high light, doesn’t mean you will have that good light. Why? An evergreen tree is in front of the window, blocking the light. Or your neighbor’s house or the neighboring apartment building is casting a shadow. All these factors must be considered when deciding how much light you have to offer your houseplants.

So now you have your light situation figured out, have purchased appropriate plants (notice that is not singular), and all is going along just fine. Then you start seeing yellow leaves and one of your plants just doesn’t seem happy. What is going on? If you have a problem with your plant, the first thing to do is figure out what the problem is. Don’t assume you have bugs and spray insecticide. It may be that your plant is simply acclimatizing to your house and while doing so, may lose a couple of leaves. It isn’t unusual and it will adjust. Yet it may be an insect problem or a fungus. This is what must be figured out before action is taken.

These are just some of the things I will cover in my upcoming webinar. Please join me to talk all things houseplants. It will be fun!

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Meet the Author

Lisa Eldred Steinkopf is the Houseplant Guru,lisaPS 4 featuring all things houseplants on her website, thehouseplantguru.com. She is the author of Houseplants, The Complete Guide to Choosing, Growing, and Caring for Indoor Plants and Grow in The Dark, How to Choose and Care for Low-Light Houseplants. In addition, she has written for Better Homes and Gardens magazine, HGTVgardens.com, Real Simple magazine, the houseplant section of Allan Armitage’s app and writes regular columns for Michigan Gardener Magazine.

 

Book Award? Me? Never.

bookBy Lisa Mason Ziegler

Acting out—a sign of future greatness?

Now I see it. My acting out in school was a result of so much good stuff bottled up inside that I couldn’t handle it. This is the image I see as I look back through elementary to my high school years.

College? Are you kidding me? I felt like a prisoner in school. Under constant pressure with no control over my own circumstances. Why on earth would I choose to continue this torture when I was counting the days to escape, whoopsie… graduate from high school. And I barely made it out.

Hi, my name is Lisa and I am dyslexic. Until my adult years, I never knew that there was a name for it. I never knew others struggled with what I faced. What seemed so easy for others was a struggle for me and others in my own family. It was only as an adult that the pieces began to fit together.

It started when my sister Suzanne called. She had just watched a documentary and through her breaking voice tried to tell me— it was our life, our story. And others had it too.

When she arrived for work the next day on my flower farm, we went to her desk and watched: The Big Picture, Rethinking Dyslexia.  She was right. It was us—hook, line and sinker. We watched it several times, with tears. Slowly, relief and affirmation began to seep in. After work, I watched it over and over. To this day it still helps me to watch it and hear others talk about dyslexia. Because I still face daily challenges. I need to be reminded that there are others, and no, we are not “normal”—we are extraordinary.

“Delightful child that needs to apply herself, talks too much, needs to practice reading and writing more, always in the middle of trouble, and often leading the way. Lisa expresses no fear.” These are the comments teachers shared with my parents through my school years. How many hours did I sit at my Dad’s drawing table (a dyslexic too) with graph paper practicing writing my letters over and over….

I didn’t really understand that I couldn’t spell. My first rude awakening as an adult was at my job as a receptionist at a very busy veterinarian hospital. A big part of that job was passing written phone messages on to the doctor. Oh boy. I was mortified when Dr. H came to me and said, “You are the best receptionist I’ve ever had. Because of that I’m saying this— you cannot spell, I’m going to correct your notes for your eyes only to help you, not to criticize.”

Major turning point in my life. From this experience I became more aware of the problems I faced. Until then it had just been filed under Lisa struggles to read and needs to improve her writing skills.

One vivid memory happened in the 3rd grade. I once again had gotten in trouble for talking. My discipline was to stay in during recess and write 25 times on the blackboard “I will not talk in Mrs. Hamner’s Class.” I could not write the sentence exactly the same over and over. I tried so hard, but the more I tried, the worse my sentences got. She saw this as defiance. With each error she added more times I had to write the sentence. I never succeeded. I remember little to nothing else from elementary school.

I grew into a “handful” in middle school. Joined the wrong crowd, because the right crowd was involved in things like advanced classes and the yearbook club— things beyond me.

In high school I learned how to keep my head down and get through the classes so I could graduate. While my friends were talking about SAT tests and college, I was silent.

I worked at that veterinary hospital for 15 years and went on to manage the office of 4 doctors and about 16 support staff. From bookkeeping to counseling pet owners and employees, it was not a job for the faint at heart, I thrived doing it. The crazier it was, the more I loved it. This prepared me for the rest of my business life. I learned the business by doing and seeing, exactly the way I, a dyslexic, was built to learn.

After making the jump from dogs to gardening and then straight into farming, I had a hankering to share and write about what I was doing. Having a computer with spellcheck almost made this possible. While folks seem to associate transposing letters and numbers with dyslexia, it is so much more than that.  Grammar, what the heck is that? I have no understanding of nouns, verbs, and adjectives. I’d rather eat worms than have to face this issue.

In spite of no working knowledge of grammar, I began scratching words out in an effort to share about this journey of becoming a successful flower farmer. That’s when I connected with a life-long family friend, Susan Ackerman. I had written something that was going to be read by a wider audience and thought I should have it proofed. Susan, a professional writer, offered to look over my work.

This was the start of an amazing journey for me. I was now susanan adult, aware that I faced issues, and had a need or drive to figure it out— not just to get out of school but for self- affirmation of this thing I wanted to share. Susan’s gentle and simple corrections and explanations helped me to recognize and begin to self correct. Susan is still my personal editor on many projects, in fact she will proofread this article. Because I almost always do all things last minute, you may find some of my writings without her “tweaking my words,” as she calls it. Susan says that’s okay, because the power in my writing is already there in my thoughts and facts and images. All she does is smooth out the mechanics.

A note from Lisa’s editor Susan Yoder Ackerman:

I always got in trouble at school for talking, too, just like Lisa. But I could spell. It seemed like I was born to recognize what a word should look like and how a sentence should flow. Reading and writing were what I did for fun, and when I grew up, writing became my profession as well.

Lisa is so good at speaking. She instinctively knows how to draw people in and teach them new insights into gardening. She knows how to mix humor with facts—how to lighten up and get a point across. These qualities are exactly what makes good writing as well. And so, when Lisa shoots me an article to go over, I can count on the quality. All I have to do is tweak the wording and the spelling and the grammar. Put an –ly on an adverb. Repair a redundancy. Correct a misspelling. I don’t revise and rewrite. I tweak.

There is no ego involved in this. Lisa never complains about my changes. Sometimes I think she doesn’t even read them.

For me, there is joy in taking her work and making the meaning just a little more accessible to the reader. It truly is an honor!

Susan

cooclIt is her having my spelling/grammar back that gave me the courage to submit a book idea based on a popular talk I’d given for years. That was my first published book in 2014, Cool Flowers with St. Lynn’s Press.

I wrote a book! I can’t tell you how stunned I was to see my words in print. In a book. Unbelievable.

I continued to excel as a speaker sharing about what I was doing on my flower farm. My ability to share the good and the bad, ups and downs, and my mere screw-ups made me a candid and factual speaker.

vegeIn 2016 I was offered a second opportunity to write a book, Vegetables Love Flowers was published in 2018 by Cool Springs Press. Again, I had the courage to tackle this project because I had Susan at my side backing me up on paper.

When I received word that Vegetables Love Flowers was awarded the Silver Medal Award by Garden Communicators International, I was shocked. I couldn’t believe my peers recognized my work; the highest honor possible in my eyes. That I’m a peer in a professional writing circle in itself is amazing to me.

I’m sharing my thank you response to the award news below. This award has made me stand taller and renewed my interest in sharing my story to encourage and educate others. Thank you GardenComm!

Dear Jenn,

Thank you so much for this good news! Beyond being so honored to be recognized by my peers I must share that this is beyond any dream I ever allowed myself to even imagine. To win an award for a book I wrote…totally amazing. Because of my dyslexia, until about 10 years ago I rarely wrote a word. But through the gentle pushing and instruction of a friend that is a professional writer I started on the journey of sharing what was rolling around in my head. While I used to be ashamed of my struggle to read and write and thought of it as a handicap, I now know that dyslexics have powerful gifts that normal folks just don’t have. I share this at every opportunity to empower kids and parents struggling with dyslexia.  Dyslexia has been such a gift for me and others– powerful speakers that speak from the heart and some of the most successful entrepreneurs in the world are dyslexics. It gives the power to pursue journeys that others only dream about.

This award is the icing on the cake of life that is affirming my journey. Thank you from the bottom of my heart to all that made this so.

Kindest Regards,

Lisa

Who knows, maybe dyslexic folks are the norm and the rest of you are broke? Remember, acting out can be a sign of greatness.

Lisa Z

P.S. A great TedX talk for more insight: The True Gifts of Dyslexics

Lisa Mason Ziegler

Founder of The Gardener’s Workshop and Flower Farming School Online .

Award-winning Author of Vegetables Love Flowers, and Cool Flowers.

Watch Lisa’s Story and view her blog Field & Garden

Connect with Lisa on Facebook  and Instagram !

A New Wave of Delaware Gardens 

header.jpegSouthern Delaware is best known for its resort towns on the Atlantic Ocean. Rehoboth Beach, Dewey Beach, and Bethany Beach draw thousands of vacationers every summer. Personally, I prefer the warm days and cool nights of early fall, after the summer crowds are gone. I’ve been vacationing in Rehoboth Beach for 25 years, for the beaches, for outlet mall shopping, for the wonderful restaurants, and more recently for riding the area’s awesome bike trails.

A new public garden will soon be another good reason to visit!

The centerpiece of the GardenComm Region II meeting on Friday, October 11, will be the newly opened Delaware Botanic Garden at Pepper Creek. This is a project I’ve been following for several years, and shortly after the garden’s location was finalized I had the opportunity to visit the site, 37 acres of abandoned farmland, creekside forest, and marshland. I wrote about it for my blog in October 2015 (see Big News in Southern Delaware) but I haven’t been back since then. Staff and volunteers have worked tirelessly to get it ready for its public opening, so I’m excited to see the progress that has been made. This will be a rare chance to visit a new botanic garden in its earliest stages.

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We have a full day planned, with an early start at Baywood Greens, a public golf course. The clubhouse has an excellent restaurant and hosts weddings and other events. The grounds are beautifully landscaped, with well-maintained gardens all around the clubhouse. When I was scouting locations this spring with Louise Clarke, she said without hesitation, “We have to bring the group here.”

From there, we’ll head to the Delaware Botanic Garden (DBG) for a tour of its gardens. The grand opening is scheduled for September 12, so we’ll be among the first visitors to see the new gardens. A meadow designed by Piet Oudolf has generated a lot of attention, and will be one of the highlights of our tour.

Lunch at Good Earth Market and Organic Farm is included in your registration. During the growing season, some of the food they serve comes from their own kitchen garden behind the restaurant. We’ll be choosing from a fixed menu, but please visit them another time for their creative and delicious selections. (A chilled cucumber soup with crab made me swoon this spring.) The property also offers lodging in the form of small cottages and a “tiny house” that attendees may want to investigate.

There are several excellent garden centers in the area, but we’ll only have time to stop at Inland Bays Garden Center, a small business that specializes in native plants. The owners will tell us a bit about the challenges of operating a small garden center in a resort area.

Among the private gardens we’ll visit are Mill Pond Garden, a private botanic garden shimzu.jpegand certified wildlife habitat created by Mike Zajic, founder of the DBG and former Director of Horticulture at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, MD. We’ll also visit the charming town of Lewes to see the garden of Holly Shimizu, former Director of the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, DC. Holly’s property even has a tiny cottage that can be rented for a romantic getaway. We’ll end the day at my own garden in Rehoboth Beach, where we can relax and socialize before heading to dinner at a nearby restaurant (optional, not included in registration).

If you’re spending Friday night in the area, join us for a bonus visit to Pepper Greenhouses in Milton on Saturday morning. This sprawling, quirky garden center is known for its huge selection of rare and unusual plants, and it’s right on the way home if you’re driving north on Rt. 1 or west on Rt. 16. Those who want to linger just a bit more will then gather for a Dutch treat lunch at a local restaurant before heading our separate ways.boggan.jpeg

Early October is a wonderful time of year to visit southern Delaware. I can’t stress enough how much this area has to see and do, and you may want to spend an extra day. At a minimum, I would recommend walking around downtown Lewes and Rehoboth Beach. In addition to shopping and dining options, you’ll appreciate the beautification efforts of two volunteer organizations, Lewes in Bloom and Rehoboth in Bloom. And if you’re going to drag a partner or spouse to one of our regional meetings, this is the one! There’s plenty for them to do while we’re off touring gardens, from riding the bike trails to kayaking in the bay, visiting WWII observation towers, birding at Gordon’s Pond, or shopping at the outlet malls. Best of all, the ocean is still warm enough for swimming!

Registration is limited to 30 attendees. Don’t delay to make your arrangements because our meeting falls on the beginning of a holiday weekend. Finding lodging Thursday night should be easy but Friday night may be a bit trickier.

Click here to register

Meet the jboggan.jpegAuthor

John Boggan is a botanist, plant breeder, occasional garden blogger, and general know-it-all. He divides his time between his gardens in Washington, DC and Rehoboth Beach, DE. His latest project is breeding begonias that are hardy in zone 7. You can find his blog at DC Tropics.

Five Items to Prepare for #GardenComm2019

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As I write this post, there are approximately 16 days, about two weeks, before the start of GardenComm’s annual conference. Though I’ve attended numerous GardenComm conferences, I’m a first timer when it comes to Salt Lake City and the mountains. I’m looking forward to seeing what their gardens look like compared to mine!

But before I board the plane that will take me non-stop from Indianapolis to SLC, I’m making lists to make sure I don’t forget anything and am ready to go once I land.

Here’s my list:

  1. Business cards. Some may think business cards are old-fashioned but most of us still prefer to get that little piece of cardboard to remember one another.  I’ve ordered and received new business cards and put them on the pile of stuff I don’t want to forget to take to the conference. 
  2. One sheets.  For the first time, GardenComm will have tables set up at the expo where members can leave copies of their one sheets for others to take. What’s a one sheet? It’s basically a one page document, sometimes printed on both sides, sometimes graphical, that provides more information about who you are and what you do.  Check out additional information on the GardenComm website.  Don’t have a one-sheet? Get busy and create one. It can be plain or use a site like Canva to dress it up, and then take it to a local print shop to make some copies. 
  3. Pitch session sign ups.  Attendees who are members of GardenComm have the amazing opportunity to pitch their ideas to editors of magazines, books, and websites. Two weeks out, there are still some open time slots so members can now sign up for more than one session. Details are on the GardenComm website. And now that I’ve signed up, I’m polishing up a pitch or two I’m planning to make and bringing copies of them with me. 
  4. Education sessions. One of the biggest decisions to make when attending any conference is which education sessions to attend. There are three during each time slot. I like to have a good idea before the conference which ones I’m planning to attend so I study the list before I leave home. They are all listed on the website. 
  5. Chargers, chargers, chargers.  I’m rounding up all the chargers I need so I can stay fully connected at GardenComm. Watch. Phone. iPad. Check, check, check.  Oh, and an extra portable battery charger for the story tours. 

What’s on your list of what to bring and what to do before you leave home? Did I forget anything?  

Meet the Author

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Carol Michel is an author, speaker, and gardener based in Indianapolis, Indiana, looking forward to her 11th GardenComm conference.  

 

Expand Your Network with a Pitch Session at #GardenComm2019!

adult agreement blur brainstorming

By Kim Toscano

Wondering if a pitch session is right for you? The answer is yes!

Whether you have a story idea, portfolio to share, or are simply seeking to build professional relationships, pitch sessions offer the perfect venue. Everyone participating in a pitch session is looking to make connections. Editors want to meet writers, photographers, and other talented storytellers. Communicators are seeking new outlets for their work and feedback on projects. Pitch sessions offer a win-win situation for everyone involved.

Pitching Yourself and Your Work

Not every story is the right match for an editor, but pitch sessions are about more than just one story. Editors want to know about you – your areas of expertise, your platform, your past work. And of course they are interested in your ideas. Don’t be surprised if an editor listens to your pitch then asks, “Are you working on anything else?” Be ready to talk about other projects, even those still in the concept stage.

When pitching a children’s story at a creative writing conference, the agent asked me this very question. He was not interested in the story I pitched, but connected with the young adult novel I was working on. He gave me his card and asked me to send the novel to him when completed. And just like that, my list of professional contacts expanded.

Pick an Editor’s Brain

abstract blackboard bulb chalk

Pitch sessions also provide an opportunity to ask questions, gain feedback, and seek advice. Not everything you discuss needs to be a finished work. At a recent conference I sat down with an editor during a pitch session to discuss a project I am working on. I let her know up front I wanted to pick her brain and she graciously obliged. In fact, our conversation carried over to lunch the next day. I garnered valuable advice while expanding my professional network.

I’ve come to realize pitch sessions are as much about learning as they were about pitching. When visiting with a garden editor you might gain valuable insights into the direction they are taking their publication, future topics they wish to explore, or types of stories they have difficulty assigning. Tap into an editor’s vast experience and use it to your advantage.

Too Nervous to Pitch?

The first time I signed up to pitch a story at a writing conference I was more than a bit anxious. I practiced my pitch over and over, tweaking and perfecting every word. And when I sat down across from the agent I signed up to meet, I forgot the words I’d carefully prepared. But it didn’t matter, because this wasn’t the agent’s first pitch session.

Hearing pitches is part of any agent or editor’s job, and they are remarkably skilled at setting writers at ease, asking questions that get you talking, and digging into the meat of a story. That is not to say don’t come prepared, just relax a little. Editors and agents are not there to intimidate you. They attend conferences to meet writers, photographers, and other talented storytellers. They want to get to know you.

So what are you waiting for? Sign up for a pitch session today!

 Sign Up!

Please note that this opportunity is only open to GardenComm’s Annual Conference & Expo attendees, and there is a one pitch-session per-person limit.

Click here to register for #GardenComm2019 today!

First Timer Event at Salt Lake City

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by GardenComm Membership Committee

It’s tough to be a newbie at an event such as the GardenComm annual conference. There are so many long-time members greeting each other and acting so familiar with the other attendees and the process in general. Those attending for the first time might feel left out or uneasy about what’s going on.

The truth is that everyone at these meetings were first-timers themselves at one point. We all remember feeling awkward and isolated. My first meeting was in Philadelphia (in 2000, if I my memory is correct) and I clearly remember walking on all tours and eating dinner by myself.  So it’s not surprising that experienced attendees on the GardenComm Membership Committee want to make this year’s newbies as comfortable and connected as possible.

We’ve tried several methods of welcoming “first timers” at past annual meetings, and this year we’re mixing those experiences in hopes of connecting the newbies with each other as well as introducing them to mentors. Here is our plan for this meeting in Salt Lake, plus a couple suggestions for the new attendees as well as those experienced members who will be mentors to the first timers.

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This year’s first timer event will be broken into segments in order to facilitate many types of connections between attendees.  As people enter those who are mentors will be asked to take chairs in the mentor’s row. The new attendees will be shown to tables where they will join other first-timers. After a brief introduction by the Membership Committee, there will be a 15 to 20 minute period when the newbies will be connecting with each other, while the mentors reconnect with those they haven’t seen for a year.

First-timers will be instructed to go around the table and introduce themselves, exchanging business cards or cell numbers. These connections will be useful for making dinner plans or for future networking. Note that if you prefer not to use business cards your contact information will also be on the conference app. Those around the table at the first-timers event can check off fellow attendees’ names and contact information on the app.

After this initial introduction period attending board members will be introduced and the first timers will be invited to sit on the row of chairs that is opposite where the mentors have been seated. At this point there will be four or five segments when mentors will talk with the first-timer seated opposite…think speed dating without the pressure for meeting the love of your life. When the bell rings the mentors will move one chair to the side and everyone will chat with the new person across from them. It’s a high-energy, loud process, but it’s a way to let newbies introduce themselves to a few mentors one-on-one for a few minutes.

Once this speed schmoozing is finished, we will all proceed to the tradeshow and let the education and more networking begin!

Throughout the conference, there are additional ways that new members can take action to feel more connected.

  • Wear your first timer ribbon if you have one. This will allow those who have signed up to be mentors to recognize you throughout the conference.
  • If you’re a relative newbie but not a first timer, don’t hesitate to approach anyone wearing a mentor ribbon and introduce yourself. Initiate conversations with others as often as possible.
  • Use the app to ask questions, connect with others with similar goals or experiences, or invite people to join you at the bar or for dinner.

Meet the Authors

This piece was written by the GardenComm membership committee; we are actively seeking new committee members with fresh ideas, strong opinions, and the willingness to connect with others. This committee meets by conference call once a month on a Friday at noon Eastern time…we bring our own snacks and occasional plant chat. If you’d like to sit in on a call to see what we’re all about, contact Shelley Cramm shelleycramm@gardenindelight.com or C.L. Fornari  clfornari@yahoo.com.

Confessions of a Region Crasher

split rocker membersby Marie Mims Butler

Hello. My name is Marie, and I am a GardenComm Region Crasher. Social meetings, connect meetings, regional meetings, and national symposiums. I crave the adventure, companionship, and inspiration that meeting with other GardenComm members delivers. In May, Region 2 Director Kathy Jentz lured me out of Region 4 to Maryland with a tantalizing blog post.

Here was a chance to venture behind the gorgeous scenery in gardens and garden centers. The promise of fresh, regional foods shared with fellow garden communicators sealed the deal for me. Road trip!

To ensure a fresh start for the day, I drove up from southeastern Virginia on Thursday. Happy hour “Up on the Roof” of my Bethesda hotel eased the tension of driving through tornado warnings and I-495 traffic. Cool breezes, rosy sunset, and the softest outline of the mountains in the distance. Ahhh…mcrillis

For the first time ever, I hauled myself out of bed for an early morning photo shoot. McCrillis Gardens was worth the wake up. This 5-acre, naturalistic garden is truly a hidden gem in a residential area in Bethesda. Once a private residence of a well-connected plant collector, it is now under the auspices of Brookside Gardens and the Montgomery County park system. The promise of seeing azaleas is not particularly special to a Virginian, but the first picture I took was of an azalea. I’ll admit I’m a “purdy flower” person. At McCrillis, the woody plants (trees and shrubs) had me gasping and “Oh wow”-ing at every turn in a path. My favorite? Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’- the pagoda dogwood. Standing like white lace against the sky, it could be a wedding venue all by itself. Head gardener, Nancy Woods, eagerly led us on a plant-centric tour and even sent us a thank you for visiting. McCrillis is a small garden with a big, green heart.

For those who can properly program a GPS (which lets me out), our next destination was a mere 20 minutes, but another world, away. Glenstone is in the heart of mega rich Potomac, MD. The private residence/art museum is available to visit by reservation, only. According to their website, “Glenstone is a place that seamlessly integrates art, architecture, and landscape into a serene and contemplative environment.” Amen to that! Our own tour member, Susan Harris has expressed the story our Glenstone tour far better than I can on the blog Garden Rant.

In the midst of modern elegance blending seamlessly into the created, natural setting, I found myself puzzling over the giant monkey head that crowned the property. (My take on art can be rather shallow.) I came to learn that Split-rocker is not a giant monkey head, but a split image of a child’s rocking pony and rocking dinosaur. Artist Jeff Koons was expressing the split in his family as he and his wife divorced. Split-rocker towers 37’ and is planted with over 24,000 plugs of annual flowers and grasses! I was stunned to hear it had been on display in NY City and Versailles. So much for my big monkey head assessment. For those who would like more visual insights into Glenstone, YouTube, Vimeo, PBS, CBS, and others have videos online. Best of all, make a reservation and experience the art that is Glenstone in person.

rooftop garden

Our next destination, another accurately programmed GPS 20 minutes away, was the fabulous new neighborhood rising from an old shopping mall site, Pike & Rose. Offices, retail spaces and living spaces are combined with a tremendous sense of environmental responsibility. Green roofs are mandatory! Our group was treated to a rare tour of Up Top Acres’ 17,000 square foot farm on the sixth floor of the Pallas building. Rare, because climbing a very steep ladder was required to reach the garden. Gardener Sara Servin enthusiastically described the challenges and rewards of growing vegetable in urban settings. For instance, staking tomatoes is a problem on a rooftop, so they are grown inground at their Navy Yard location. Litter is another rooftop issue.  Most recently, old CDs have been found all over the garden. ???.  Oh the story those could tell…

With so much focus on growing fresh produce, our lunch from Sweetgreen was deliciously appropriate. We gathered our preselected salads served in compostable bowls and found seats in a shady spot in one of many gathering spaces designed into the Pike & Rose community.

It’s amazing what can be achieved when conscience, design, and investment blend in harmony.

schwartz peony garden

Leaving the urban for the rural, we headed to Seneca Creek State Park to see the last of the blooms in the Schwartz Peony Garden. In 1915, fascination became an obsession for real estate broker Edward Schwartz. His collection led to founding a nursery specializing in peonies. When Edward P. Schwartz’s property was sold after his death, a fraction of his collection wound up in Seneca Creek Park. A sampling of his varieties has been arranged in neat, volunteer-tended, rows. The rest have gone feral in the adjoining field. It’s almost surreal to see peonies popping up at random in a field of grasses and weeds. What a magnificent sight Mr. Schwartz’s original plantings must have been. As we prepared to leave, treats awaited us in the parking area. Raffle prizes were awarded, and the generous gifts of elephant ears and agapanthus from Brent and Becky’s Bulbs were handed out. Thank you, generous donors!susanna farms

On to Susanna Farm Nursery in Boyds, MD where fantasies of Japanese maples and conifers come to life. Attendees took advantage of the opportunity to shop for themselves or their clients, observe the specimen forms of plants they already have, add to their photo libraries, and recharge their cell phones. I saw several stunning Japanese maples from Susanna Farms when I visited Brookside Gardens the following day. Definitive right plant in the right place.

Lilypons

As temperatures soared, Lilypons Water Gardens offered refreshing views andchampagne punch. Whenever I think of water gardening, Lilypons is my first resource for aquatic plants and water garden supplies. Now I will remember them as mays seafood.jpegthoughtful hosts in a beautifully tranquil setting as well. 

To conclude our whirlwind day, the remaining, hungry souls gathered at locally owned May’s Restaurant in Frederick, MD. Cold beverages, witty conversation, and fresh seafood were enjoyed by all. (Well, almost all. Louise had meatloaf.) To those who were driving home that night, safe travels were wished while more shopping and sightseeing tips were passed along to those, like me, who were staying overnight before heading out.

GardenComm offers me irresistible travel opportunities that I often pair with visits to friends, family, and even more gardens. I like to expand the experience! Perhaps it’s time you joined me in Region Crashing. We can form our own support group, Region Crashers Anonymous, and encourage each other to jump those boundaries and boldly go where few GardenComm members have gone before. Are you with me?

Meet the AuthorMarieMims

Marie Mims Butler is a GardenComm Region 4 Director, speaker, and gardening enthusiast. Residing in Cheaspeake, VA, Marie is ready to travel at the jingle of a keyring. Want to share tales? Contact marie.butler@cox.net.

Collecting Obsessions in Potomac, MD

headBy Kathy Jentz

Plant lovers don’t know how to say “No.” Let’s face it, we are a greedy lot and our passion can quickly grow into a life-long mission of acquiring one of every kind of a favorite flower or shrub.  On the upcoming Region 2 Meeting on the last Friday of May (5/24), we will be touring through gardens that were created by several obsessive gardeners and collectors.

We start off the day at McCrillis Gardens  for an early morning photo shoot. This little-known public garden is a hidden gem in a prosperous suburban neighborhood.  Williamgazebo McCrillis made the garden and it is best known for the collection of azaleas, but it also has many rare ornamental trees and shade-loving perennials. He was assistant to Harold Ickes, the secretary of the interior from 1933 to 1946. McCrillis became friends with the chief horticulturist for the National Park Service, who helped him acquire trees and plants globally.

Next, we visit Glenstone, which houses the collection of post-World War II art of Emily and Mitch Rales in a sustainable landscape.  We’ll also get to experience their newly opened Environmental Center is a multi-use maintenance and education facility that offers experiential learning. Here you can learn about our efforts in composting, organic landscape flower management, waste reduction, materials recycling and water conservation—and how to take these practices home with you.

For lunch, we go to the Pike & Rose development and a rooftop farm, Up Top Acres. We’ll learn about the transformation of a suburban sprawl to an urban oasis.

The Seneca Park Shwartz Peony Garden  is thanks to Edward P. Schwartz, a wealthy realtor, who put together a massive personal collection of peonies from dealers in Holland, France, England, and Germany as well as the United States. The field on display is only a portion of that original collections, but is still impressive.

Susanna Farm Nursery is offering our attendees a susanna20% discount: off any purchase, but it is Brant Baker’s obsession with dwarf conifers and Japanese maples that make this a “do not miss” stop. The “farm” looks more like an arboretum with its large specimen collection in a spectacular landscape setting.

Join us at the end of the day for an old-fashioned champagne punch cocktail at LilyPons Water Gardens, the perfect cap-off to a truly filling day. You can explore this 100+-year-old family business that was founded by G. Leicester Thomas, Sr., who turned his goldfish and water lily hobby collections into a thriving business.

Finally, those of us who want to avoid the worst of the evening rush hour can join us for Dutch-treat dinner at May’s Seafood, known for classic Maryland crabcakes.

I urge you to sign up TODAY as there are only 30 spots available and they will fill fast!

Meet the Author

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Kathy Jentz is editor of Washington Gardener Magazine and a long-time DC-area gardening enthusiast.  To book her for a garden talk, find her at Great Garden Speakers.  She also edits the IWGS Water Garden Journal and is a columnist and guest blogger for several other publications. Her latest foray is as the social media voice for horticultural brands. She can be reached at KathyJentz@gmail.com.

 

 

 

Facebook Livens Up Communication

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By Peggy Riccio

This blog post originally appeared as an article in the March-April 2018 issue of On the QT, GardenComm’s newsletter. “GWA” has been changed to “GardenComm” to reflect our new change.

Many GardenComm members use Facebook to promote their products and communicate gardening messages. With almost two billion monthly users, Facebook can be an effective platform for building a garden communicator’s business.

About a year ago, Facebook launched Facebook Live (FBL), enabling users to broadcast and interact with viewers. Viewers can comment during the event and the user or broadcaster can reply in real time. Once posted, the video can be re-purposed for other communications such as a link in an e-mail newsletter.

Facebook Live can be spontaneous, inexpensive and yield a high level of viewers and engagement, resulting in an increased number of followers (or customers). Using FBL garners more viewers because Facebook prioritizes live posts and high engagement activity.

According to Facebook’s website, “Facebook Live videos are more likely to appear higher in News Feed when these videos are actually live, compared to after they are no longer live. On average, people spend more than three times more time watching a FBL video compared to a video that is no longer live and to comment more than ten times more on a FBL video than on a regular video.”

GARDENCOMM MEMBERS USE FACEBOOK LIVE

Eleven GardenComm members responded to a callout for people to talk about their use of FBL as a promotional tool to increase their reach and build their following.

Most learned to use FBL through trial and error but all agreed that it was simple to learn. All the respondents recommended FBL, provided that you are comfortable in front of a camera and there is high quality content. Interestingly, the live feature adds an attractive human dimension.

IMPRESSIVE RESULTS

“My business coach told me about how much the Facebook algorithm prioritizes Facebook Live videos over pre-recorded videos or written content,” said Katie Elzer-Peters. “I decided to try it and was amazed with the number of eyeballs on my video, which translated to new leads for my business.”

A few were intrigued after hearing about or seeing others use FBL. “I saw a lecture about using Facebook Live as a promotional tool at the GardenComm conference in Atlanta, and I decided to give it a go,” Jessica Walliser said. “My first video was about growing sesame seeds from the garden at the Atlanta History Center the very next day. It was watched almost 2,000 times and shared by over a dozen people. I couldn’t believe it!”

Kim Roman conducted weekly book giveaways for the Square Foot Gardening Foundation culminating in short FBL posts. “Since using videos and FBL, our reach has definitely increased—from about 400 for a regular post to at least 1,400 for a FBL event,” Kim said.

“Using Facebook Live captures the moderator’s excitement, surroundings and real time experiences,” Teri Speight said.

“It is imperfectly, but uniquely, a great way to invite people to follow you, and then they also will read your written words,” Jen McGuinness said. “I recommend using Facebook Live because it helps showcase your personality and provides a human element to those who are only familiar with your writing or photography.

HOW TO USE FACEBOOK LIVE

  • You only need your computer or mobile phone. Although it is best to use Wi-Fi, you should have at least a 4G connection.
  • To start, look where you would normally post on Facebook for a red, old-fashioned movie camera with an eye in the middle and the word “Live” next to it.
  • Click on the icon and you will be directed to a screen where you can see what will be seen by your viewers.
  • Select the audience (for example, friends, only me or public).
  • Type a short description of your video.
  • After you tap “Go Live,” you have a three-second countdown. While taping, you will see feedback in the form of comments or symbols representing feelings.
  • You don’t have to respond, but the more engaged you are with your audience the more interesting the experience and the more likely you will have viewers during and after.
  • When you are done, tap “Finish.”

TIPS WHEN USING FACEBOOK LIVE

Equipment

Dee Nash: An external mic is the best way to have good sound. However, with just my iPhone 7, I can make pretty good Facebook Live videos.

Gary Bachman: Landscape view, use a wired lapel mic or Bluetooth. Do not rely on the omni-directional phone mic. Use a tripod with the camera set a little above eye height (my personal preference). Selfie sticks will work but tend to move unintentionally, making it harder to view. If you want to build your audience, be consistent. Keep it short—five to seven minutes.

Timing

Jessica Walliser: Keep it short—three to four minutes. Find something interesting to show people. Teach them something; a quick tidbit they can use in their own garden. Hold the camera steady and vertically. If you mess up, don’t stop and say “I messed up, let me try that again.” Just keep going.

Kim Roman: Announce ahead of time that you’re going to do a Facebook Live event; give the date and time, including the time zone. When you start your session, say something interesting but “fluffy” and give people a chance to gather—keep this under a minute.

Katie Dubow: Plan at least two to three minutes of content, because the longer you are on, the more people will see your video.

Consistency

Erin Schanen: Even if you don’t have a large audience for the “live” video, it will still get a lot of views when you post it to your page. Go back and answer questions you might have missed and post links (affiliate, if possible) to the products and plants you talked about. I use the same wireless lavaliere mic I use for videos, but a wired lavaliere will help too.

Chris Link: Make sure whatever content you are posting is well thought out and worth people’s time to consume it.

Katie Elzer-Peters: Write notes for what you want to cover ahead of time. Commit to a regular schedule. Include a call to action: Like your Facebook page, buy your book, subscribe to your email list. Summarize at the end of the video. Use a tripod.

Jenny Peterson: To practice, set up your Facebook post as if you were doing a live video, but change your privacy setting to “Only Me.” Put your phone on “Do Not Disturb.” Make sure your Wi-Fi connection is strong. Interact with your audience, even if nobody is commenting.

Jen McGuinness: To prevent the phone’s battery from being drained, plug the phone into a portable battery in your pocket. To prevent a shaky transmission, use a mount for your phone.

Meet the Author

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Horticulturist and writer Peggy Riccio publishes PegPlant.com, which features local gardening news, resources, and plants for those who garden in the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area.

Clip art from Sitejerk.com